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Pedigree Dogs > Border Collie

Breed Information

 

The Border Collie is a herding dog breed developed in the Anglo-Scottish border region for herding livestock, especially sheep.

Typically extremely energetic, acrobatic, and athletic, they frequently compete with great success in dog sports, in addition to their success in sheepdog trials, and are often cited as the most intelligent of all dogs. In January 2011, a Border Collie was reported to have learned 1,022 words, and acts consequently to human citation of those words.

In general, Border Collies are medium-sized dogs without extreme physical characteristics and with a moderate amount of coat, which is often thick and frequently sheds. Their double coats vary from slick to lush, and come in many colours, although black and white is the most common. Black tricolour (black/tan/white or sable and white), red (chocolate) and white, and red tricolour (red/tan/white) also occur regularly, with other colours such as blue, lilac, red merle, blue merle, brindle, and "Australian red"/gold seen less frequently. Border Collies may also have single-colour coats.

Height at withers: Males from 19 to 22 in (48 to 56 cm), females from 18 to 21 in (46 to 53 cm).

Border Collies require considerable daily physical exercise and mental stimulation. If an individual is unable to provide his or her dog with plenty of exercise and mental stimulation, the border collie is not the dog to choose.

True to their working heritage, Border Collies make very demanding, energetic pets that are better off in households that can provide them with plenty of play and exercise with humans or other dogs. Due to their demanding personalities and need for mental stimulation and exercise, many border collies develop neurotic behaviors in households that are not able to provide for their needs. They are infamous for chewing holes in walls, biting and chewing on furniture such as chairs and table legs and digging holes out of boredom. As a result, an alarming number of border collies end up in shelters and rescues every year. One of the prime reasons for getting rid of a border collie is their unsuitability for families with small children, cats, and other dogs, due to their intense desire to herd; this was bred into them for hundreds of years and still one of their chief uses outside the household.

The natural life span of the Border Collie is between 10 and 17 years, with an average lifespan of twelve years.

 

 

       

 

 

 

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